MS Assistantship in Physiological Ecology: University of Alaska Anchorage

FW by Andy Wilson
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University of Alaska Anchorage: MS Assistantship in Physiological Ecology. A research assistantship is available to participate in an NSF funded study of the importance of winter snow for the growth and reproduction of white spruce trees growing near their northern limit in Alaska. During the summer months, the position will be based at a remote site near the Arctic treeline in Noatak National Preserve, northwest AK. The study sites are approximately 20 miles east of Noatak and 40 miles north of Kotzebue, AK. Access is via bush plane during the summer and snowmachine during the winter.
The successful candidate will measure photosynthetic and growth responses of the study trees to experimental deepening of the winter snowpack in three contrasting habitats. There are no permanent facilities at the study site. Applicants should be prepared to spend long periods of time in the field between breaks in a well-appointed camp with a small group of collaborators. Physical fitness is essential for this position, which will require carrying up to a 50 lb pack over rough terrain and across a swift flowing river. Outdoor recreational opportunities (hiking, packrafting, fly fishing) are outstanding. The successful candidate will be based in Anchorage during the off-season (mid-
September- late May). Laboratory and desk/office space is available and affordable housing can be found within a bike ride of campus. Anchorage is a surprisingly diverse city with outstanding outdoor recreation opportunities, including more than 130 km of groomed Nordic ski trails within the city limits. To apply, please send a resume and cover letter to Dr. Paddy Sullivan (pfsullivan@alaska.edu).

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